How to use essential oils as plant-based medicine to reverse disease and boost your energy

How to use essential oils as plant-based medicine to reverse disease and boost your energy

Mother Nature knows more than humans will ever know. And she provides everything we could ever need to maintain vibrant health well into our mature years.

And I don’t care what the “officials” say – something made from chemicals in a lab will never work better than what Mother Nature can come up with. The irony is… most of the treatments are created in a lab today is just trying to duplicate what Nature already does.

Essential oils are today’s natural miracle remedies… yet the practice of using essential oils has been around for thousands of years.

In fact, using essential oils dates back to the ancient Egyptians. And in many ancient texts the oils were often referred to as “nectar of the Gods.”

There are also over 500 references to essential oils in the Bible. Obviously these miracles of Mother Nature were highly revered by Ancient Man.

Essential oils have become a bit of a “buzz” word that a lot of people talk about. Yet, if you ask someone “what are essential oils”… you’ll get a different answer every time!

Adding In Hot Water

Essential oils can be added into hot water to for vapors to inhale. When a few drops are added into a bowl of hot water, the water creates vapors that can be inhaled, curing your soul and body.

When you’re just getting started, one of the most confusing aspects of essential oils is how to use them.

There are really only three basic ways:

1. Smell them
2. Apply them
3. Eat them

Using the fragrance of Real essential oils has been documented for eons. It’s how most people are introduced to them.

So when it comes to smelling them, you have a couple of options: you can put a few drops in your hand and smell them directly; or you can put them in a special device called a diffuser that sprays a fine mist into the air.

Diffusing is a great way to keep any room smelling fresh and vibrant all day long.

The other two are pretty self-explanatory: you can rub them on your body or you can eat them.

Be warned: Some oils are very powerful and if you rub them directly onto your skin, you may break out in a rash. When using a new oil, it’s best to rub it on only a small area first to see how you react.

And when I say “eat” them – most people just put a few drops in their favorite beverage or on their food.

Remember to use real therapeutic oils if you want to try that, as synthetic oils can be dangerous.

How do I prepare a solution?

As a rule of thumb, essential oils should be diluted in a carrier substance (vegetable or nut oil, or water) at no greater concentration than 3-5%.

That means if you have one teaspoon (5cc) of carrier, you would add 3 drops of pure essential oil. This would make a 3% solution that could be used on a portion of the body.

For massage or for application over large areas of the body, a 1% solution (meaning, one drop of essential oil in one teaspoon of carrier) is generally a safe concentration. For infants, using a 0.25% solution is recommended (.5% for toddlers).

More about the techniques?

  • Compress: The essential oil is diluted in a liquid carrier (water or oil) and applied to a dressing or directly to the affected area. Optional heat or cold can be applied.For example, a few drops of ginger (Zinziber officinalis) essential oil can be added to comfortably hot water and mixed to disperse the oil; then a cloth can be soaked in the solution and placed on a stiff joint. Additional heat can be applied as desired.
  • Gargle: Drops of essential oil are added to water. You mix, then gargle the solution and spit it out. Do NOT swallow it. For example, one drop of tea tree oil in a glass of water can be gargled for sore throat discomfort.
  • Bath: Drops of essential oils are added to bath water in a dispersant immediately before stepping in. This method results in absorption through the skin, as well as inhalation of the volatilized essential oil. A few tablespoons of full cream milk can be used as a dispersant.Remember, essential oils are not water soluble; thus they will float on top of the bath and skin passing through the oil will be exposed to full strength essential oil. Bath salts can also be used to disperse essential oils. A relaxing bath base can be made by mixing one part baking soda, two parts Epsom salts, and three parts sea salt. Add six drops of true lavender essential oil to about two tablespoons of this mixture and mix it into bath water just before entering.
  • Massage: Drops of essential oil are added to a natural carrier oil and applied to skin areas with gentle rubbing. As noted earlier, massage blends should not exceed 1% concentration of essential oils (one drop in a teaspoon) for adults. For children, concentration should not exceed 0.25% for infants, 0.5% for toddlers age 6 months to 2 years, and 1% for children 2 years and older. The choice of essential oils for massage depends on the desired effect.
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